Beginners Guide to QAN – Fast, Scalable, and Quantum Resistant

27m
cryptonewmedia

Libra Association Ready to Address Regulatory Concerns, Claims Board Member

44m
beincrypto

RBC Analysts: Squashing Libra Could Boost China’s Digital Currency

1h
cointelegraph

eToro Launches Crypto Portfolio That Gauges Market Sentiment

1h
cryptoglobe

XRP Price Exits Downtrend to Hit Three-Week High

1h
cryptonewmedia

Dark web picks Bitcoin over other currencies, report

1h
bitcoinwarrior

Sally Ho's Technical Analysis 16 October 2019

1h
cryptodaily

Libra Association Announces 21 Founding Members

1h
dcebrief

Crypto impersonation scammers migrate from Twitter to Instagram

1h
cryptoslate

RSK Increased Its Merged Mining Rewards; Bitcoin Miners to Gain More?

2h
cryptonewmedia

A Wild Centrality Appears in the Top-60 Market Cap — But Why?

2h
beincrypto

Klaytn launches $1M prize pool blockchain app developer competition

2h
cryptonewmedia

HSBC Enacts a Letter of Credit on a Blockchain in Malaysia

2h
cointelegraph

6 Commonly Asked Cryptocurrency Tax Questions » The Merkle Hash

3h
cryptonewmedia

Threatened by Libra, US Central Bankers Reconsider a “FedCoin”

3h
beincrypto

SEC Restarts Clock on Proposed ‘Bitcoin and T-Bills’ ETF

3h
coindesk

Crypto.com sparks cryptocurrency adoption in the US with sweeping expansion

3h
bitcoinwarrior

Gate.io adds Ontology (ONT) to interest earning program

3h
cryptonewmedia

Bitcoin’s 18 Millionth Coin Will Be Mined This Week

4h
beincrypto

Bitcoin Bear Flag Could Cause Crypto Asset To Retest February 2018 Lows

4h
cryptonewmedia

Litecoin new favorite among crypto sextortionists, report

4h
bitcoinwarrior

What is SoloGenic?

4h
nulltx

New Gov’t Initiative to Put South Korean Trade on Blockchain by 2021

4h
cointelegraph

Bitcoin Bear Flag Could Cause Crypto Asset To Retest February 2018...

4h
newsbtc

humankind will swim in it |

4h
cryptonewmedia


MIT’s ‘Fiat Cryptography’ System Automates the Process of Securing Almost Anything

coindesk

4mon ago

The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT designed a system to run complex mathematical algorithms to secure online communication. “Fiat Cryptography,” as the code is called, currently secures about 90 percent of Google Chrome communications.

Researchers presented their paper at the EEE Symposium on Security and Privacy in May, though the technology was originally theorized and deployed in MIT labs in 2018.

Fiat Cryptography is designed to automatically generate — and simultaneously verify — optimized cryptographic algorithms for all hardware platforms, a process which used to be done by hand.

You heard that right: as recently as a year ago the internet’s data encryption was achieved by a gaggle of cryptographers who would write and rewrite algorithms, manually weighing various mathematical techniques and chip architectures to optimize for performance.

Apart from the obvious issue of human-introduced bugs and nonoptimal algorithms, overtime, the maths or chip architecture the algorithms were written for would become obsolete, meaning pen would have to scratch paper again.

Researchers looked for a solution first in C programming and assembly languages, and transferred those techniques to their code library — a list of best-performing algorithms for each architecture.

Using a compiler to convert programming languages into code the algorithms are then automatically proofed with Coq, a mathematical theorem prover. Each iteration is tested before the best-performing one is selected for a particular chip architecture.

During the process researchers leveraged the body of human written code already in existence, and found that the automated process of generating keys and certificates for data encryption matches the performance of the best handwritten code, but completes it much faster.

“It’s basically like taking a process that ran in human brains and understanding it well enough to write code that mimics that process,” said Adam Chlipala, a CSAIL researcher who worked on the project, in an interview with MIT News.

Fiat Cryptography has since been deployed by Google’s BoringSSL, an open-source cryptographic library used by Google Chrome, Android apps, and other programs.

Chlipala was joined by CSAIL graduate students Andres Erbsen as first author and Jade Philipoom and Jason Gross as co-authors, as well as Robert Sloan, an engineering graduate student.

The researchers are currently working on ways to make their compiler run even faster in searching for optimized algorithms.

Regarding any copyrights issue, please contact us:content@hashbee.com.

0 comments